"The World Wide Web Consortium’s Encrypted Media Extensions (EME) is a DRM system for web video, being pushed by Netflix, movie studios, and a few broadcasters. It’s been hugely controversial within the W3C and outside of it, but one argument that DRM defenders have made throughout the debate is that the DRM is optional, and if you don’t like it, you don’t have to use it. That’s not true any more.

Some time in the past few days, Google quietly updated Chrome (and derivative browsers like Chromium) so that Widevine (Google’s version of EME) can no longer be disabled; it comes switched on and installed in every Chrome instance.

Because of laws like section 1201 of the US Digital Millennium Copyright Act (and Canada’s Bill C11, and EU implementations of Article 6 of the EUCD), browsers that have DRM in them are risky for security researchers to audit. These laws provide both criminal and civil penalties for those who tamper with DRM, even for legal, legitimate purposes, and courts and companies have interpreted this to mean that companies can punish security researchers who reveal defects in their products. "

REST AT https://goo.gl/y2BEss

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